Fallen Star

I first saw the large scale installations of Korean-born artist Do Ho Suh at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle. And now, with the opening his Fallen Star in San Diego, it seems another West Coast trip may be in order…

I’ll let the photographs speak for themselves, but you can read more about Do Ho Suh and Fallen Star (which rests seven stories up, atop the University of California/San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering) here.

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A Family of Mustachioed Men

This is the third in a series of Memorial Day posts recognizing some of the historic figures memorialized through sculpture in downtown Colorado Springs. See the first post here, and the second post here.

This guy had a great mustache. And from the look of things, he came by his facial hair naturally, bred in a family of mustachioed men.

Spencer “Spec” Penrose (1865-1939) didn’t arrive on the scene in Colorado Springs until 1891, but he made a splash when he showed up.  Penrose built the Broadmoor Hotel and the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, and had his hand in many other local landmarks as well. Continue reading

tweet tweet

You may have noticed a new widget in my sidebar.

Housestory is now on Twitter. So if you’re on Twitter, just click on the widget to get my tweets. I love how silly that combination of words sounds, so I’ll say it again: Click on the widget to get my tweets.

A Latte for Zebulon

This is the second in a series of Memorial Day posts recognizing some of the historic figures memorialized through sculpture in downtown Colorado Springs. See the first post here.

It’s hard not to be cool when you have a name like Zebulon.

Lucky for Zebulon Pike, he led an adventurous life equal to his name.
Continue reading

An Inspiring Place for Play

I would love to have this playground in my neighborhood.

And yes, it is as it looks: a limited edition bronze sculpture designed as a functional playground!

Created by artist Tom Otterness, the piece above was commissioned as a private installation in Massachusetts. But, Otterness has done public playgrounds as well, including the Big Girl Playground in Yonkers, NY Continue reading

In Memoriam of Memorials

To walk through downtown Colorado Springs is to gain a beginner’s history of the city and the Pikes Peak region.

Life-size bronze sculptures dot the major intersections, and provide a walking tour of who’s who in our history.

Including one of General Palmer on a horse. I talk a lot about Palmer. (Okay, truth be told, I sort of have a crush on him.) But there were certainly others that helped to shape our community in ways just as numerous and meaningful. And many of them stand downtown, tall and bronzed.

So in honor of Memorial Day, my posts this month will include nods to some of our region’s other historic notables, as documented by downtown’s collection of sculptures. Continue reading

Art in the Digital Age

I have a box of old floppy disks, loaded with critical data that I needed to save from the early 90’s. I also have a MacBook, and so no way to access any of that important information.

But, thanks to artist Nick Gentry of London, my disks can be saved from the landfill!

Gentry is creating “social art from the obsolete” with his Xchange program. You send him your disks, he makes art with them. And, if you include your address along with your donated disks, he’ll even send you “a gift for your contribution.”

via Stranger than Vintage

Play Me, I’m Yours

I love the idea of this touring public art project by artist Luke Jerram.

Play Me, I’m Yours began in Birmingham, England in 2008, and has been traveling internationally ever since. So far, the project has placed public pianos in 22 cities. Continue reading

Little Cabin in the Big City

Manifest Destiny!, by Jenny Chapman and Mark Reigelman, has brought a little log cabin to downtown San Francisco.

A site-specific public art piece installed last November, the cabin will hang on the side of the Hotel des Arts through October of this year.

Here’s my favorite thing about this piece: Not only is it made from reclaimed wood from an 1890’s barn, but the reach for authenticity includes the cabin’s interior as well. Inside, the tiny structure is fully outfitted with a rocking chair, a functioning wood stove and tea stained curtains.

Read more about it here.