A Good Room and Three Squares

This is the fourth in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See earlier posts here.

A 2001 article in the Colorado Springs Gazette cited that tuberculosis treatment before antibiotics included “three hearty meals a day, plus 6 raw eggs and 8 to 10 glasses of milk.”

Last week I wrote about the large tuberculosis sanitariums that helped define Colorado Springs in the early 20th century. And they surely gave out a lot of eggs and milk.

But there were smaller, private tuberculosis boarding houses providing good rooms and three squares as well. Continue reading

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A History of Hospitals

This is the third in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See earlier posts here and here.

The Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce’s 1917 brochure, City of Sunshine, advertised a list of eleven well-respected tuberculosis sanitoria and private boarding houses serving tuberculars. Interestingly, at least three of these institutions have persevered to modern times, growing into Colorado Springs’ main modern-day hospitals. Below is a then and now, in pictures and words: Continue reading

Union Printers: A Dime at a Time

So, back to tuberculosis. This is the second in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See the first post here

As you drive along Union Avenue, on the southern edge of downtown Colorado Springs, the small storefronts and retail spaces suddenly give way to this:

The Union Printers Home, built in 1892 by the International Typographical Union (ITU), to serve its elderly and sick members.

A beautiful building, made of “Castle Rock white lava stone, with red sandstone trimmings”, the home was first referred to as the Childs-Drexel Home for Union Printers. Continue reading