Old School//New Artists

ImageFor any of you housestory readers that are local in Colorado Springs–there is a great new home for artist studios in town: The Old Midland School has been restored by local civil engineering firm Terra Nova Engineering, and is hosting an open house this weekend. It’s a beautiful old school, and you can tour the artist studios while you wander through and appreciate the architecture.

Read more about the school and the project in the Colorado Springs Independent.

 

housestory: On the Road

Summer is winding down for us now in Colorado Springs, and we spent the past few weeks on vacation. But now we’re back in town. And so at last…a new post!

I’m a sucker for those brown road signs. You know the ones, posted along American freeways and highways, designed to point the way to significant cultural sites and historic markers.

So when we stopped for the night in Rock Springs, Wyoming on a recent road trip between Colorado Springs and the Pacific Northwest, I just had to follow the signs to downtown Rock Springs. Continue reading

A Family of Mustachioed Men

This is the third in a series of Memorial Day posts recognizing some of the historic figures memorialized through sculpture in downtown Colorado Springs. See the first post here, and the second post here.

This guy had a great mustache. And from the look of things, he came by his facial hair naturally, bred in a family of mustachioed men.

Spencer “Spec” Penrose (1865-1939) didn’t arrive on the scene in Colorado Springs until 1891, but he made a splash when he showed up.  Penrose built the Broadmoor Hotel and the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, and had his hand in many other local landmarks as well. Continue reading

tweet tweet

You may have noticed a new widget in my sidebar.

Housestory is now on Twitter. So if you’re on Twitter, just click on the widget to get my tweets. I love how silly that combination of words sounds, so I’ll say it again: Click on the widget to get my tweets.

A Latte for Zebulon

This is the second in a series of Memorial Day posts recognizing some of the historic figures memorialized through sculpture in downtown Colorado Springs. See the first post here.

It’s hard not to be cool when you have a name like Zebulon.

Lucky for Zebulon Pike, he led an adventurous life equal to his name.
Continue reading

In Memoriam of Memorials

To walk through downtown Colorado Springs is to gain a beginner’s history of the city and the Pikes Peak region.

Life-size bronze sculptures dot the major intersections, and provide a walking tour of who’s who in our history.

Including one of General Palmer on a horse. I talk a lot about Palmer. (Okay, truth be told, I sort of have a crush on him.) But there were certainly others that helped to shape our community in ways just as numerous and meaningful. And many of them stand downtown, tall and bronzed.

So in honor of Memorial Day, my posts this month will include nods to some of our region’s other historic notables, as documented by downtown’s collection of sculptures. Continue reading

A Good Room and Three Squares

This is the fourth in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See earlier posts here.

A 2001 article in the Colorado Springs Gazette cited that tuberculosis treatment before antibiotics included “three hearty meals a day, plus 6 raw eggs and 8 to 10 glasses of milk.”

Last week I wrote about the large tuberculosis sanitariums that helped define Colorado Springs in the early 20th century. And they surely gave out a lot of eggs and milk.

But there were smaller, private tuberculosis boarding houses providing good rooms and three squares as well. Continue reading

A History of Hospitals

This is the third in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See earlier posts here and here.

The Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce’s 1917 brochure, City of Sunshine, advertised a list of eleven well-respected tuberculosis sanitoria and private boarding houses serving tuberculars. Interestingly, at least three of these institutions have persevered to modern times, growing into Colorado Springs’ main modern-day hospitals. Below is a then and now, in pictures and words: Continue reading

Union Printers: A Dime at a Time

So, back to tuberculosis. This is the second in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See the first post here

As you drive along Union Avenue, on the southern edge of downtown Colorado Springs, the small storefronts and retail spaces suddenly give way to this:

The Union Printers Home, built in 1892 by the International Typographical Union (ITU), to serve its elderly and sick members.

A beautiful building, made of “Castle Rock white lava stone, with red sandstone trimmings”, the home was first referred to as the Childs-Drexel Home for Union Printers. Continue reading

Built for Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis was big money  for Colorado Springs in the early 1900’s. So much so that a 1917 Chamber of Commerce booklet devoted more than half of its 87 pages to detailing all the reasons why tuberculars should make the trek out west.

They could have nice, fresh, “germ-free” air and loads of sunshine. A stunning mountain climate would provide beautiful vistas and thin, dry air at the same time. And, as if those weren’t reason enough, welcoming citizens and local businesses were on hand to provide ample opportunities for rest and relaxation, a nourishing diet, and a charming social life. All of which, according to medical thinking of that time, were just what the doctor ordered for “lungers”. Continue reading