Old School//New Artists

ImageFor any of you housestory readers that are local in Colorado Springs–there is a great new home for artist studios in town: The Old Midland School has been restored by local civil engineering firm Terra Nova Engineering, and is hosting an open house this weekend. It’s a beautiful old school, and you can tour the artist studios while you wander through and appreciate the architecture.

Read more about the school and the project in the Colorado Springs Independent.

 

housestory: On the Road

Summer is winding down for us now in Colorado Springs, and we spent the past few weeks on vacation. But now we’re back in town. And so at last…a new post!

I’m a sucker for those brown road signs. You know the ones, posted along American freeways and highways, designed to point the way to significant cultural sites and historic markers.

So when we stopped for the night in Rock Springs, Wyoming on a recent road trip between Colorado Springs and the Pacific Northwest, I just had to follow the signs to downtown Rock Springs. Continue reading

Fallen Star

I first saw the large scale installations of Korean-born artist Do Ho Suh at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle. And now, with the opening his Fallen Star in San Diego, it seems another West Coast trip may be in order…

I’ll let the photographs speak for themselves, but you can read more about Do Ho Suh and Fallen Star (which rests seven stories up, atop the University of California/San Diego’s Jacobs School of Engineering) here.

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Wildfire Relief Effort

It’s definitely been a rough week for Colorado Springs. The Waldo Canyon wildfire has destroyed close to 350 houses, and more than 30,000 were evacuated from their homes.

But here’s a way to help. Local designers have started an effort to design and sell wildfire t-shirts, with 100% of the proceeds supporting Colorado wildfire victims. Funds will benefit the Colorado branch of American Red Cross, local food bank Care and Share, Colorado Fire Relief Fund, and Immediate Local Wildfire Relief.

At this point, there are already 18 design choices, and each shirt sells for just $20. You can read an article about the program in the Colorado Springs Business Journal. Or go straight to the website to buy a shirt.

tweet tweet

You may have noticed a new widget in my sidebar.

Housestory is now on Twitter. So if you’re on Twitter, just click on the widget to get my tweets. I love how silly that combination of words sounds, so I’ll say it again: Click on the widget to get my tweets.

An Inspiring Place for Play

I would love to have this playground in my neighborhood.

And yes, it is as it looks: a limited edition bronze sculpture designed as a functional playground!

Created by artist Tom Otterness, the piece above was commissioned as a private installation in Massachusetts. But, Otterness has done public playgrounds as well, including the Big Girl Playground in Yonkers, NY Continue reading

A Good Room and Three Squares

This is the fourth in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See earlier posts here.

A 2001 article in the Colorado Springs Gazette cited that tuberculosis treatment before antibiotics included “three hearty meals a day, plus 6 raw eggs and 8 to 10 glasses of milk.”

Last week I wrote about the large tuberculosis sanitariums that helped define Colorado Springs in the early 20th century. And they surely gave out a lot of eggs and milk.

But there were smaller, private tuberculosis boarding houses providing good rooms and three squares as well. Continue reading

A History of Hospitals

This is the third in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See earlier posts here and here.

The Colorado Springs Chamber of Commerce’s 1917 brochure, City of Sunshine, advertised a list of eleven well-respected tuberculosis sanitoria and private boarding houses serving tuberculars. Interestingly, at least three of these institutions have persevered to modern times, growing into Colorado Springs’ main modern-day hospitals. Below is a then and now, in pictures and words: Continue reading

Union Printers: A Dime at a Time

So, back to tuberculosis. This is the second in a series of posts chronicling some of the tuberculosis-influenced architecture in Colorado Springs. See the first post here

As you drive along Union Avenue, on the southern edge of downtown Colorado Springs, the small storefronts and retail spaces suddenly give way to this:

The Union Printers Home, built in 1892 by the International Typographical Union (ITU), to serve its elderly and sick members.

A beautiful building, made of “Castle Rock white lava stone, with red sandstone trimmings”, the home was first referred to as the Childs-Drexel Home for Union Printers. Continue reading