Spend some time with art.

Pikes Peak Arts Fest

See art. Hear art. Create art. Buy art. 

Spend some time with art at Pikes Peak Arts Fest, a juried arts festival held in the heart of downtown Colorado Springs. The 9th annual festival will be held July 5-7, 2013 at America the Beautiful Park, 126 Cimino Drive, Colorado Springs.

With a record number of participating artists, this year’s festival includes several new elements, including a New Artist program (providing a free rental canopy and waived booth fee to selected local artists), and a great line-up of local food vendors and food trucks.

Performances by more than 20 regional music, dance and spoken word groups will span the 3-day festival. Local arts organizations will provide a selection of hands-on arts activities for all ages, including projects by Bemis School of Art, local galleries, and more!

Read all about it at http://www.pikespeakartsfest.com

An App for History

I ordered my iPhone this weekend, and oh so excited am I.

When my husband and I went low-tech on our phones a few years ago, I canceled the data plan on my phone, and have seen nary an app since then.

But it’s time to rejoin the 21st century, and when my phone arrives, I want to check out a new app from the Old Colorado City Historical Society (profiled on local NPR station KRCC’s The Big Something).

You can download it too, it’s free on iTunes. My phone won’t be here until later this week, so tell me what you think!

A Family of Mustachioed Men

This is the third in a series of Memorial Day posts recognizing some of the historic figures memorialized through sculpture in downtown Colorado Springs. See the first post here, and the second post here.

This guy had a great mustache. And from the look of things, he came by his facial hair naturally, bred in a family of mustachioed men.

Spencer “Spec” Penrose (1865-1939) didn’t arrive on the scene in Colorado Springs until 1891, but he made a splash when he showed up.  Penrose built the Broadmoor Hotel and the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, and had his hand in many other local landmarks as well. Continue reading

An Inspiring Place for Play

I would love to have this playground in my neighborhood.

And yes, it is as it looks: a limited edition bronze sculpture designed as a functional playground!

Created by artist Tom Otterness, the piece above was commissioned as a private installation in Massachusetts. But, Otterness has done public playgrounds as well, including the Big Girl Playground in Yonkers, NY Continue reading

In Memoriam of Memorials

To walk through downtown Colorado Springs is to gain a beginner’s history of the city and the Pikes Peak region.

Life-size bronze sculptures dot the major intersections, and provide a walking tour of who’s who in our history.

Including one of General Palmer on a horse. I talk a lot about Palmer. (Okay, truth be told, I sort of have a crush on him.) But there were certainly others that helped to shape our community in ways just as numerous and meaningful. And many of them stand downtown, tall and bronzed.

So in honor of Memorial Day, my posts this month will include nods to some of our region’s other historic notables, as documented by downtown’s collection of sculptures. Continue reading

Play Me, I’m Yours

I love the idea of this touring public art project by artist Luke Jerram.

Play Me, I’m Yours began in Birmingham, England in 2008, and has been traveling internationally ever since. So far, the project has placed public pianos in 22 cities. Continue reading

Little Cabin in the Big City

Manifest Destiny!, by Jenny Chapman and Mark Reigelman, has brought a little log cabin to downtown San Francisco.

A site-specific public art piece installed last November, the cabin will hang on the side of the Hotel des Arts through October of this year.

Here’s my favorite thing about this piece: Not only is it made from reclaimed wood from an 1890’s barn, but the reach for authenticity includes the cabin’s interior as well. Inside, the tiny structure is fully outfitted with a rocking chair, a functioning wood stove and tea stained curtains.

Read more about it here.

Built for Tuberculosis

Tuberculosis was big money  for Colorado Springs in the early 1900’s. So much so that a 1917 Chamber of Commerce booklet devoted more than half of its 87 pages to detailing all the reasons why tuberculars should make the trek out west.

They could have nice, fresh, “germ-free” air and loads of sunshine. A stunning mountain climate would provide beautiful vistas and thin, dry air at the same time. And, as if those weren’t reason enough, welcoming citizens and local businesses were on hand to provide ample opportunities for rest and relaxation, a nourishing diet, and a charming social life. All of which, according to medical thinking of that time, were just what the doctor ordered for “lungers”. Continue reading

Art on the Streets

Last month I posted about historypin, a great site linking historic images to Google’s Street View. Today, here’s an arts counterpart, Red Bull’s Street Art View, which tracks murals and graffiti. Continue reading